Table of Contents
Economics Research International
Volume 2010 (2010), Article ID 860425, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/860425
Research Article

China, India, and the Socioeconomic Determinants of Their Competitiveness

Comparison and Transition of Economic Systems, Goethe-University Frankfurt, Dantestraße 9, 60325 Frankfurt, Germany

Received 4 April 2010; Accepted 27 July 2010

Academic Editor: Ussif Rashid Sumaila

Copyright © 2010 Claudia Grupe and Axel Rose. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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