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Enzyme Research
Volume 2015, Article ID 404607, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/404607
Research Article

Pseudomonas aeruginosa Exopolyphosphatase Is Also a Polyphosphate: ADP Phosphotransferase

Departamento de Biología Molecular, FCEFQyN, Universidad Nacional de Río Cuarto, Ruta 36 Km 601, Río Cuarto, 5800 Córdoba, Argentina

Received 30 July 2015; Accepted 27 September 2015

Academic Editor: Sunney I. Chan

Copyright © 2015 Paola R. Beassoni et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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