Table of Contents
Epidemiology Research International
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 436548, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/436548
Research Article

Do Demographic Profiles of Listed and Unlisted Households Differ? Results of a Nationwide Telephone Survey

1Harry Perkins Institute of Medical Research, The University of Western Australia, Perth, WA 6009, Australia
2Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, B Block, Hospital Avenue, Nedlands, WA 6009, Australia

Received 15 September 2013; Accepted 14 February 2014; Published 18 March 2014

Academic Editor: Susana Sans Menendez

Copyright © 2014 Renee N. Carey et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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