Table of Contents
Epidemiology Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 295958, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/295958
Research Article

Radiation May Indirectly Impair Growth Resulting in Reduced Standing Height via Subclinical Inflammation in Atomic-Bomb Survivors Exposed at Young Ages

1Department of Statistics, Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hijiyama Park 5-2, Minami-ku, Hiroshima 732-0815, Japan
2Department of Clinical Studies, Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hijiyama Park 5-2, Minami-ku, Hiroshima 732-0815, Japan

Received 23 October 2014; Revised 16 January 2015; Accepted 16 January 2015

Academic Editor: Leo J. Schouten

Copyright © 2015 Eiji Nakashima et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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