Table of Contents
Epilepsy Research and Treatment
Volume 2010 (2010), Article ID 310753, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/310753
Research Article

Connexin36 Gap Junction Blockade Is Ineffective at Reducing Seizure-Like Event Activity in Neocortical Mouse Slices

1Department of Anesthesiology, Waikato Clinical School, Waikato Hospital, University of Auckland, Pembroke St, Hamilton 3204, New Zealand
2Faculty of Health, Medicine and Life Sciences, Maastricht University, Maastricht 6200, The Netherlands

Received 15 October 2010; Accepted 14 December 2010

Academic Editor: Scott Baraban

Copyright © 2010 Logan J. Voss et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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