Table of Contents
Epilepsy Research and Treatment
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 4718372, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/4718372
Research Article

Epidemiology of Acute Symptomatic Seizures among Adult Medical Admissions

1Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics Unit/Neurology Unit, Department of Medicine, Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, PMB 5025, Nnewi 435101, Anambra State, Nigeria
2Neurology Unit, Department of Medicine, Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, PMB 5025, Nnewi 435101, Anambra State, Nigeria
3Gastroenterology Unit, Department of Medicine, Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, PMB 5025, Nnewi 435101, Anambra State, Nigeria

Received 12 October 2015; Revised 21 December 2015; Accepted 24 December 2015

Academic Editor: Morten I. Lossius

Copyright © 2016 Paul Osemeke Nwani et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Acute symptomatic seizures are seizures occurring in close temporal relationship with an acute central nervous system (CNS) insult. The objective of the study was to determine the frequency of presentation and etiological risk factors of acute symptomatic seizures among adult medical admissions. It was a two-year retrospective study of the medical files of adults patients admitted with acute symptomatic seizures as the first presenting event. There were 94 cases of acute symptomatic seizures accounting for 5.2% (95% CI: 4.17–6.23) of the 1,802 medical admissions during the period under review. There were 49 (52.1%) males and 45 (47.9%) females aged between 18 years and 84 years. The etiological risk factors of acute symptomatic seizures were infections in 36.2% () of cases, stroke in 29.8% (), metabolic in 12.8% (), toxic in 10.6% (), and other causes in 10.6% (). Infective causes were more among those below fifty years while stroke was more in those aged fifty years and above. CNS infections and stroke were the prominent causes of acute symptomatic seizures. This is an evidence of the “double tragedy” facing developing countries, the unresolved threat of infectious diseases on one hand and the increasing impact of noncommunicable diseases on the other one.