Table of Contents
Geography Journal
Volume 2015, Article ID 486740, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/486740
Research Article

Geographic Concerns on Flood Climate and Flood Hydrology in Monsoon-Dominated Damodar River Basin, Eastern India

Department of Geography, The University of Burdwan, Barddhaman, West Bengal 713104, India

Received 12 August 2014; Revised 30 November 2014; Accepted 3 December 2014

Academic Editor: Achim A. Beylich

Copyright © 2015 Sandipan Ghosh and Biswaranjan Mistri. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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