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Genetics Research International
Volume 2012, Article ID 276948, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/276948
Review Article

Regulation of Ribosomal RNA Production by RNA Polymerase I: Does Elongation Come First?

1LBME du CNRS, 118 route de Narbonne, 31000 Toulouse, France
2Laboratoire de Biologie Moleculaire Eucaryote, Université de Toulouse, 118 route de Narbonne, 31000 Toulouse, France
3Universität Regensburg, Biochemie-Zentrum Regensburg (BZR), Lehrstuhl Biochemie III, 93053 Regensburg, Germany

Received 31 August 2011; Accepted 27 September 2011

Academic Editor: Sebastián Chávez

Copyright © 2012 Benjamin Albert et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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