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Genetics Research International
Volume 2012, Article ID 431531, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/431531
Review Article

Aphids: A Model for Polyphenism and Epigenetics

1Department of Biological Sciences, Rowan University, Glassboro, NJ 08028, USA
2School of Biological Sciences, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588, USA

Received 14 September 2011; Accepted 1 December 2011

Academic Editor: Vett Lloyd

Copyright © 2012 Dayalan G. Srinivasan and Jennifer A. Brisson. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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