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Genetics Research International
Volume 2012, Article ID 795069, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/795069
Review Article

Finding a Balance: How Diverse Dosage Compensation Strategies Modify Histone H4 to Regulate Transcription

Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, MI 48109-1048, USA

Received 15 June 2011; Accepted 8 August 2011

Academic Editor: Victoria H. Meller

Copyright © 2012 Michael B. Wells et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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