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Genetics Research International
Volume 2012, Article ID 845429, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/845429
Review Article

Epigenetic Control of Circadian Clock Operation during Development

National Key Laboratory of Virology, College of Life Sciences, Wuhan University, Luojia Hill, Wuchang District, Hubei, Wuhan 430072, China

Received 30 August 2011; Revised 22 December 2011; Accepted 13 January 2012

Academic Editor: Elfride De Baere

Copyright © 2012 Chengwei Li et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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