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Genetics Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 431487, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/431487
Review Article

Importance of Genetic Diversity Assessment in Crop Plants and Its Recent Advances: An Overview of Its Analytical Perspectives

1Centre for Plant Breeding and Genetics, Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore 641 003, India
2International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics, Patancheru, Telangana 502324, India
3School of Life Science, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli 620 024, India

Received 17 July 2014; Revised 24 November 2014; Accepted 27 November 2014

Academic Editor: Igor B. Rogozin

Copyright © 2015 M. Govindaraj et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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