Table of Contents Author Guidelines
Genetics Research International
Volume 2018, Article ID 7089109, 12 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/7089109
Review Article

Phenotypic Nonspecificity as the Result of Limited Specificity of Transcription Factor Function

Department of Biology, The University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada N6A 1B7

Correspondence should be addressed to Anthony Percival-Smith; ac.owu@avicrepa

Received 12 June 2018; Accepted 9 October 2018; Published 28 October 2018

Academic Editor: Martin Kupiec

Copyright © 2018 Anthony Percival-Smith. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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