Table of Contents
Hepatitis Research and Treatment
Volume 2010 (2010), Article ID 267412, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/267412
Research Article

Treatment of Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection in Dialysis Patients: An Update

1Department of Nephrology, Dialysis, and Organ Transplantation, Toulouse University Hospital, CHU Rangueil, 1 avenue Jean Poulhès, TSA 50032- 31059- Toulouse Cédex 9, France
2INSERM U858, Toulouse University Hospital, CHU Rangueil, IFR 31, 1 avenue Jean Poulhès, TSA 50032, 31059 Toulouse Cédex 9, France
3Laboratory of Virology, Toulouse University Hospital, CHU Purpan, 330 avenue de Grande-Bretagne, TSA 40031, 31059 Toulouse Cédex 9, France
4INSERM U563, Toulouse University Hospital, CHU Purpan, IFR 30, 330 avenue de Grande-Bretagne, TSA 40031, 31059 Toulouse Cédex 9, France

Received 27 May 2010; Revised 19 August 2010; Accepted 24 August 2010

Academic Editor: Tatehiro Kagawa

Copyright © 2010 Hugo Weclawiak et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a blood-borne infection and its prevalence used to be elevated in hemodialysis (HD) patients. Its main mode of contamination relies on nosocomial transmission. HCV infection is frequently associated in HD patients with normal liver enzymes whereas liver histology can display some degree of HCV-related lesions. The assessment of HCV-related lesions, even in HD dialysis patients, can be done via noninvasive tests. After kidney transplantation, HCV-related lesions can worsen; however, in this setting antiviral treatment harbors the risk of acute rejection. Therefore, it is recommended to implement antiviral treatment while the patient is receiving dialysis therapy. In this setting, the rate of viral clearance is usually high. In case of sustained virological response, no relapse occurs after kidney transplantation, despite heavy immunosuppression.