Table of Contents
Hepatitis Research and Treatment
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 757246, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/757246
Clinical Study

Circulating Cytokines and Histological Liver Damage in Chronic Hepatitis B Infection

1Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330, Thailand
2Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330, Thailand
3Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330, Thailand
4Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330, Thailand
5Department of Pediatrics, Center of Excellence in Clinical Virology, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330, Thailand

Received 29 May 2013; Revised 3 September 2013; Accepted 20 September 2013

Academic Editor: Piero Luigi Almasio

Copyright © 2013 Kittiyod Poovorawan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Each phase of hepatitis B infection stimulates distinct viral kinetics and host immune responses resulting in liver damage and hepatic fibrosis. Our objective has been to correlate host inflammatory immune response including circulating Th1 and Th2 cytokines in patients with chronic hepatitis B infection with liver histopathology. Sixty-four patients with chronic hepatitis B without previous treatment were recruited. The liver histology and histological activity index were assessed for various degrees of necroinflammation and hepatic fibrosis. We determined circulating levels of the Th1 and Th2 cytokines. Forty-six males and 18 females at a median age of 34.5 years were studied. HBeAg was present in 28/64 (43.75%) of the patients. In patients negative for HBeAg, IL-10 and IFN-gamma were significantly correlated with degrees of necroinflammation ( , , resp.; ). Moreover, TNF-alpha was significantly correlated with degrees of fibrosis ( ; ), and IL-10 and TNF-alpha were significantly correlated with significant fibrosis ( , , resp.; ). These correlations were found in the HBeAg negative group as opposed to the HBeAg positive group. In HBeAg negative patients, circulating cytokines IL-10 and IFN-gamma were correlated with degrees of necroinflammation, whereas IL-10 and TNF-alpha were correlated with significant fibrosis.