Table of Contents
International Journal of Antibiotics
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 302182, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/302182
Research Article

Protolichesterinic Acid: A Prominent Broad Spectrum Antimicrobial Compound from the Lichen Usnea albopunctata

1Agroprocessing and Natural Products Division, National Institute for Interdisciplinary Science and Technology (NIIST), Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala 695019, India
2Division of Crop Protection/Division of Crop Utilization, Central Tuber Crops Research Institute, Sreekariyam, Thiruvananthapuram 695017, India

Received 30 April 2014; Revised 2 June 2014; Accepted 15 July 2014; Published 10 August 2014

Academic Editor: Silvano Esposito

Copyright © 2014 Nishanth Kumar Sasidharan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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