Table of Contents
International Journal of Bacteriology
Volume 2014, Article ID 560617, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/560617
Research Article

Isolation and Antimicrobial Susceptibility Patterns of Campylobacter Species among Diarrheic Children at Jimma, Ethiopia

1School of Medicine, Dire Dawa University, Dire Dawa, Ethiopia
2Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences and Pathology, College of Public Health and Medical Sciences, Jimma University, Jimma, Ethiopia
3Department of Medical Microbiology, Immunology & Parasitology, College of Allied Health Sciences, Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

Received 22 August 2013; Revised 22 November 2013; Accepted 11 December 2013; Published 12 January 2014

Academic Editor: Gary Dykes

Copyright © 2014 Belay Tafa et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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