Table of Contents
International Journal of Bacteriology
Volume 2016, Article ID 3714785, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/3714785
Research Article

Isolation, Identification, and Antibiotic Susceptibility Testing of Salmonella from Slaughtered Bovines and Ovines in Addis Ababa Abattoir Enterprise, Ethiopia: A Cross-Sectional Study

1Haramaya University College of Veterinary Medicine, P.O. Box 138, Dire Dawa, Ethiopia
2Aklilu Lemma Institute of Pathobiology, P.O. Box 1176, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

Received 9 June 2016; Revised 12 July 2016; Accepted 25 July 2016

Academic Editor: Gary Dykes

Copyright © 2016 Abe Kebede et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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