Table of Contents
International Journal of Bacteriology
Volume 2016, Article ID 9727810, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/9727810
Research Article

Direct Electrical Current Reduces Bacterial and Yeast Biofilm Formation

1Division of Clinical Microbiology, Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905, USA
2Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905, USA
3Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905, USA

Received 10 December 2015; Accepted 4 February 2016

Academic Editor: Gary Dykes

Copyright © 2016 Maria Ruiz-Ruigomez et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

New strategies are needed for prevention of biofilm formation. We have previously shown that 24 hr of 2,000 µA of direct current (DC) reduces Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm formation in vitro. Herein, we examined the effect of a lower amount of DC exposure on S. epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Propionibacterium acnes, and Candida albicans biofilm formation. 12 hr of 500 µA DC decreased S. epidermidis, S. aureus, E. coli, and P. aeruginosa biofilm formation on Teflon discs by 2, 1, 1, and 2 log10 cfu/cm2, respectively (). Reductions in S. epidermidis, S. aureus, and E. coli biofilm formation were observed with as few as 12 hr of 200 µA DC (2, 2 and 0.4 log10 cfu/cm2, resp.); a 1 log10 cfu/cm2 reduction in P. aeruginosa biofilm formation was observed at 36 hr. 24 hr of 500 µA DC decreased C. albicans biofilm formation on Teflon discs by 2 log10 cfu/cm2. No reduction in P. acnes biofilm formation was observed. 1 and 2 log10 cfu/cm2 reductions in E. coli and S. epidermidis biofilm formation on titanium discs, respectively, were observed with 12 hr of exposure to 500 µA. Electrical current is a potential strategy to reduce biofilm formation on medical biomaterials.