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International Journal of Biodiversity
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 237525, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/237525
Research Article

Acacia sieberiana Effects on Soil Properties and Plant Diversity in Songa Pastures, Rwanda

1National University of Rwanda, P.O. Box 56, Huye, Rwanda
2Universite Libre de Kigali, Rubavu Campus, P.O. Box 243, Gisenyi, Rwanda

Received 3 July 2013; Accepted 9 September 2013

Academic Editor: Curtis C. Daehler

Copyright © 2013 C. P. Mugunga and D. T. Mugumo. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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