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International Journal of Biodiversity
Volume 2013, Article ID 273948, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/273948
Research Article

Dynamics and Conservation Management of a Wooded Landscape under High Herbivore Pressure

Centre for Conservation Ecology and Environmental Science, School of Applied Sciences, Bournemouth University, Talbot Campus, Poole, Dorset BH12 5BB, UK

Received 8 March 2013; Accepted 7 May 2013

Academic Editor: James T. Anderson

Copyright © 2013 Adrian C. Newton et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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