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International Journal of Biodiversity
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 163431, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/163431
Review Article

Holistic Management: Misinformation on the Science of Grazed Ecosystems

1Kiesha’s Preserve, Paris, ID 83261, USA
2Wild Utah Project, Salt Lake City, UT 84101, USA
3Grand Canyon Trust, Flagstaff, AZ 86001, USA
4Western Watersheds Project, Pinedale, WY 82941, USA
5Foundation for Deep Ecology, Bend, OR 97708, USA

Received 6 February 2014; Accepted 24 March 2014; Published 23 April 2014

Academic Editor: Lutz Eckstein

Copyright © 2014 John Carter et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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