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International Journal of Biodiversity
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 727025, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/727025
Review Article

Axillary Bud Proliferation Approach for Plant Biodiversity Conservation and Restoration

1Section Biologie-Chimie, Département des Sciences Naturelles, École Normale Supérieure, BP 6983, Bujumbura, Burundi
2Key Laboratory of Molecular Epigenetics of the Ministry of Education (MOE), Northeast Normal University, Changchun 130024, China

Received 16 January 2014; Accepted 8 March 2014; Published 6 April 2014

Academic Editor: Rafael Riosmena-Rodríguez

Copyright © 2014 F. Ngezahayo and B. Liu. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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