Table of Contents
International Journal of Biodiversity
Volume 2016, Article ID 7930857, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/7930857
Research Article

Diversity of Woody Plant Species of Gamuwa and Oda Forests of Humbo Carbon Project, Wolaita, Ethiopia: For Conservation and Management of Forests

Department of Biology, Wolaita Sodo University, Wolaita Sodo, Ethiopia

Received 7 June 2016; Accepted 26 October 2016

Academic Editor: Alexandre Sebbenn

Copyright © 2016 Markos Kuma. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. R. Lal, “Soil science and the carbon civilization,” Soil Science Society of America Journal, vol. 71, no. 5, pp. 1425–1437, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  2. P. Smith, D. Martino, Z. Cai et al., “Agriculture,” in Climate Change 2007: Mitigation. Contribution of Working Group III to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, B. Metz, O. R. Davidson, P. R. Bosch, R. Dave, and L. A. Meyer, Eds., pp. 497–540, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK, 2007. View at Google Scholar
  3. F. Achard, H. D. Eva, P. Mayaux, H.-J. Stibig, and A. Belward, “Improved estimates of net carbon emissions from land cover change in the tropics for the 1990s,” Global Biogeochemical Cycles, vol. 18, no. 2, p. GB2008, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  4. FDRE (Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia), Ethiopia's Climate-Resilient Green Economy, Green Economy Strategy, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, September 2011.
  5. World Bank, World Development Indicators (WDI), 2012.
  6. S. P. Hubbell, R. B. Foster, S. T. O'Brien et al., “Light-gap disturbances, recruitment limitation, and tree diversity in a neotropical forest,” Science, vol. 283, no. 5401, pp. 554–557, 1999. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  7. O. I. Sumina, “Plant communities on Anthrop genetically disturbed sited on the Chukotkapensula, Russia,” Journal of Vegetation Science, vol. 5, pp. 885–896, 1994. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  8. E. J. Luoga, E. T. F. Witkowski, and K. Balkwill, “Regeneration by coppicing (resprouting) of miombo (African savanna) trees in relation to land use,” Forest Ecology and Management, vol. 189, no. 1–3, pp. 23–35, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  9. N. Ramírez-Marcial, M. González-Espinosa, and G. Williams-Linera, “Anthropogenic disturbance and tree diversity in Montane Rain Forests in Chiapas, Mexico,” Forest Ecology and Management, vol. 154, no. 1-2, pp. 311–326, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  10. D. Tilman, Plant Strategies and the Dynamics and Structure of Plant Communities, Princeton University Press, Princeton, NJ, USA, 1988.
  11. WCMC, World Conservation Monitoring. Global Biodiversity: Status of Earth's Living Resources Dhagman and Hall, WCMC, London, UK, 1992.
  12. P. Ssegawa and D. N. Nkuutu, “Diversity of vascular plants on Ssese islands in Lake Victoria, central Uganda,” African Journal of Ecology, vol. 44, no. 1, pp. 22–29, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  13. K. A. Kershaw, Quantitative and Dynamic Plant Ecology, Edward Arnold Publishers LTD, London, UK, 2nd edition, 1973.
  14. D. W. Shimwell, The Description and Classification of Vegetation, University of Washington Press, Seattle, Wash, USA, 1984.
  15. M. Kuma and S. Shibru, “Floristic composition, vegetation structure, and regeneration status of woody plant species of oda forest of Humbo Carbon Project, Wolaita, Ethiopia,” Journal of Botany, vol. 2015, Article ID 963816, 9 pages, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  16. D. Gurmu, “Humbo community-managed natural regeneration project,” Final report, 2006. View at Google Scholar
  17. E. Van der Maabel, “Transformation of cover-abundance values in phytosociology and its effects on community similarity,” Vegetatio, vol. 39, no. 2, pp. 97–114, 1979. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  18. A. E. Magurran, Ecological Diversity and Measurement, Princeton University Press, Princeton, NJ, USA, 1988.
  19. M. Kent and P. Coker, Vegetation Description and Analysis. A Practical Approach, Belhaven Press, London, UK, 1992.
  20. D. K. Kennard, K. Gould, F. E. Putz, T. S. Fredericksen, and F. Morales, “Effect of disturbance intensity on regeneration mechanisms in a tropical dry forest,” Forest Ecology and Management, vol. 162, no. 2-3, pp. 197–208, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  21. A. Sapkota, A. P. Chelikowsky, K. E. Nachman, A. J. Cohen, and B. Ritz, “Exposure to particulate matter and adverse birth outcomes: a comprehensive review and meta-analysis,” Air Quality, Atmosphere & Health, vol. 5, no. 4, pp. 369–381, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  22. L. A. Bruijnzeel, Hydrology of Moist Tropical Forests and Effects of Conversion: A State of Knowledge Review, Humid Tropics Programme, IHP-UNESCO, Paris, France; Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 1990.
  23. T. Enters, Land degradation and resource conservation in the highlands of northern Tailand: the limits to economic evaluations [Ph.D. thesis], Australian National University, Canberra, Australia, 1992.
  24. S. D. Wilkie and M. C. Trexler, “Bio geophysical setting and global climate change,” Central Africa: Global Climate Change and Development. Technical Report, Biodiversity Support Program (A Consortium of World Wildlife Fund, The Nature Conservancy, and World Resources Institute), Washington, DC, USA, 1993. View at Google Scholar