Table of Contents
International Journal of Biodiversity
Volume 2017, Article ID 8326361, 6 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/8326361
Research Article

Mitochondrial DNA Phylogenetics of Black Rhinoceros in Kenya in relation to Southern Africa Population

1Institute of Primate Research, P.O. Box 24481, Karen, Nairobi 00502, Kenya
2National Museums of Kenya, P.O. Box 40658, Nairobi 00100, Kenya
3University of Nairobi, P.O. Box 30197, Nairobi 00100, Kenya

Correspondence should be addressed to Elijah K. Githui; moc.oohay@iuhtigek

Received 11 May 2017; Revised 6 July 2017; Accepted 20 July 2017; Published 22 August 2017

Academic Editor: Alexandre Sebbenn

Copyright © 2017 Elijah K. Githui et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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