Table of Contents
International Journal of Brain Science
Volume 2014, Article ID 946039, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/946039
Research Article

The Elusive Role of the Left Temporal Pole (BA38) in Language: A Preliminary Meta-Analytic Connectivity Study

1Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Florida International University, 11200 SW 8th Street, AHC3-431B, Miami, FL 33199, USA
2Department of Radiology/Research Institute, Miami Children’s Hospital, Miami, FL, USA
3Department of Psychology, Florida Atlantic University, Davie, FL, USA

Received 26 August 2014; Revised 4 October 2014; Accepted 7 October 2014; Published 21 October 2014

Academic Editor: João Quevedo

Copyright © 2014 Alfredo Ardila et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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