Table of Contents
International Journal of Evolutionary Biology
Volume 2011, Article ID 274975, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/274975
Research Article

Elevated Evolutionary Rates among Functionally Diverged Reproductive Genes across Deep Vertebrate Lineages

1Department of Botany, University of British Columbia, 6270 University Boulevard, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 1Z4
2Department of Biology, Temple University, 1900 North 12th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19122, USA

Received 1 February 2011; Revised 17 May 2011; Accepted 23 May 2011

Academic Editor: Jose M. Eirin-Lopez

Copyright © 2011 Christopher J. Grassa and Rob J. Kulathinal. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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