Table of Contents
International Journal of Evolutionary Biology
Volume 2011, Article ID 360654, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/360654
Research Article

A Molecular Perspective on Systematics, Taxonomy and Classification Amazonian Discus Fishes of the Genus Symphysodon

1Laboratório de Evolução e Genética Animal, Departamento de Biologia, Universidade Federal do Amazonas, Avenida Rodrigo Octávio Jordão Ramos, 3000, 69077-000 Manaus, AM, Brazil
2Instituto Federal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia do Espírito Santo, Unidade Vitória, Avenida Vitória, 1729, 29040-780 Vitoria, ES, Brazil
3Biology Department, University of Puerto Rico—Rio Piedras, 00931 San Juan, PR, Puerto Rico

Received 21 December 2010; Accepted 2 May 2011

Academic Editor: Martin J. Genner

Copyright © 2011 Manuella Villar Amado et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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