Table of Contents
International Journal of Evolutionary Biology
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 382679, 17 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/382679
Research Article

The Archaeological Record Speaks: Bridging Anthropology and Linguistics

1Departament de Filologia Catalana and Centre de Lingüística Teòrica, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Edifici B, 08193 Barcelona, Spain
2Departamento de Filología Española y sus Didácticas, Universidad de Huelva, Campus de El Carmen, 21071 Huelva, Spain
3Department of Anthropology, Center for the Advanced Study of Human Paleobiology, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052, USA
4Departamento de Literatura Española, Teoría da Literatura e Lingüística Xeral, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Campus Norte, 15782 Santiago de Compostela, Spain
5Departamento de Filología Española, Universidad de Oviedo, Campus El Milán, 33011 Oviedo, Spain
6Department of Linguistics, University of Maryland, 1102 Marie Mount Hall, College Park, MD 20742, USA

Received 15 September 2010; Accepted 31 January 2011

Academic Editor: John Gowlett

Copyright © 2011 Sergio Balari et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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