Table of Contents
International Journal of Evolutionary Biology
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 423821, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/423821
Research Article

Evolutionary Origins of the Fumonisin Secondary Metabolite Gene Cluster in Fusarium verticillioides and Aspergillus niger

1UCD Conway Institute of Biomolecular and Biomedical Research, UCD School of Medicine and Medical Sciences, and UCD Complex and Adaptive Systems Laboratory, University College Dublin, Dublin 4, Ireland
2Smurfit Institute of Genetics, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2, Ireland

Received 15 October 2010; Revised 10 January 2011; Accepted 15 March 2011

Academic Editor: Hiromi Nishida

Copyright © 2011 Nora Khaldi and Kenneth H. Wolfe. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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