Table of Contents
International Journal of Evolutionary Biology
Volume 2011, Article ID 485460, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/485460
Research Article

Male-Female Interactions and the Evolution of Postmating Prezygotic Reproductive Isolation among Species of the Virilis Subgroup

Department of Biology, University of Winnipeg, 515 Portage Avenue, Winnipeg, MB, Canada R3B 2E9

Received 25 October 2010; Accepted 3 February 2011

Academic Editor: Jeremy Marshall

Copyright © 2011 Nada Sagga and Alberto Civetta. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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