Table of Contents
International Journal of Evolutionary Biology
Volume 2011, Article ID 632484, 18 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/632484
Research Article

A 150-Year Conundrum: Cranial Robusticity and Its Bearing on the Origin of Aboriginal Australians

School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia

Received 15 October 2010; Accepted 16 December 2010

Academic Editor: Bing Su

Copyright © 2011 Darren Curnoe. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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