Table of Contents
International Journal of Evolutionary Biology
Volume 2011, Article ID 989438, 20 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/989438
Review Article

Gene Duplication and the Genome Distribution of Sex-Biased Genes

Department of Biology, University of Texas at Arlington, P.O. Box 19498, Arlington, TX 76019, USA

Received 29 December 2010; Revised 26 March 2011; Accepted 5 June 2011

Academic Editor: Rob Kulathinal

Copyright © 2011 Miguel Gallach et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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