Table of Contents
International Journal of Evolutionary Biology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 341932, 24 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/341932
Review Article

In with the Old, in with the New: The Promiscuity of the Duplication Process Engenders Diverse Pathways for Novel Gene Creation

Department of Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131, USA

Received 18 May 2012; Accepted 3 June 2012

Academic Editor: Frédéric Brunet

Copyright © 2012 Vaishali Katju. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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