Table of Contents
International Journal of Evolutionary Biology
Volume 2012, Article ID 490894, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/490894
Review Article

The Evolution of Novelty in Conserved Gene Families

Department for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, Spemannstraße 37, 72076 Tübingen, Germany

Received 16 March 2012; Accepted 23 April 2012

Academic Editor: Frédéric Brunet

Copyright © 2012 Gabriel V. Markov and Ralf J. Sommer. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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