Table of Contents
International Journal of Evolutionary Biology
Volume 2012, Article ID 874153, 17 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/874153
Research Article

Vehicles, Replicators, and Intercellular Movement of Genetic Information: Evolutionary Dissection of a Bacterial Cell

1Department of Biological and Environmental Science, Center of Excellence in Biological Interactions, University of Jyväskylä, 40014 Jyväskylä, Finland
2Division of Evolution, Ecology and Genetics, Research School of Biology, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia

Received 9 December 2011; Revised 6 February 2012; Accepted 8 February 2012

Academic Editor: Hiromi Nishida

Copyright © 2012 Matti Jalasvuori. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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