Table of Contents
International Journal of Evolutionary Biology
Volume 2012, Article ID 897157, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/897157
Review Article

Divergence in Defence against Herbivores between Males and Females of Dioecious Plant Species

Department of Biology, The University of Winnipeg, Winnipeg, MB, Canada R3B 2G3

Received 29 June 2012; Revised 21 September 2012; Accepted 17 October 2012

Academic Editor: Jeremy L. Marshall

Copyright © 2012 Germán Avila-Sakar and Cora Anne Romanow. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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