Table of Contents
International Journal of Evolutionary Biology
Volume 2014, Article ID 198069, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/198069
Research Article

Is the Frequency Content of the Calls in North American Treefrogs Limited by Their Larynges?

Department of Biological Sciences, University of the Pacific, 3601 Pacific Avenue, Stockton, CA 95211, USA

Received 31 May 2014; Accepted 1 September 2014; Published 23 September 2014

Academic Editor: Hirohisa Kishino

Copyright © 2014 Marcos Gridi-Papp. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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