Table of Contents
International Journal of Evolutionary Biology
Volume 2014, Article ID 416497, 18 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/416497
Review Article

Plasticity-Mediated Persistence in New and Changing Environments

Department of Biological Sciences, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, AB, Canada T2N 1N4

Received 18 July 2014; Revised 29 September 2014; Accepted 30 September 2014; Published 15 October 2014

Academic Editor: Hirohisa Kishino

Copyright © 2014 Matthew R. J. Morris. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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