Table of Contents
International Journal of Evolutionary Biology
Volume 2014, Article ID 475981, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/475981
Review Article

DNA Methylation, Epigenetics, and Evolution in Vertebrates: Facts and Challenges

Laboratory of Molecular Evolution, Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn, 80121 Naples, Italy

Received 31 July 2013; Revised 11 November 2013; Accepted 23 November 2013; Published 16 January 2014

Academic Editor: Y. Satta

Copyright © 2014 Annalisa Varriale. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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