Table of Contents
International Journal of Evolutionary Biology
Volume 2015, Article ID 756269, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/756269
Research Article

Evolutionary Consequences of Male Driven Sexual Selection and Sex-Biased Fitness Modifications in Drosophila melanogaster and Members of the simulans Clade

Department of Biology, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, ON, Canada L8S 4K1

Received 14 April 2015; Revised 22 June 2015; Accepted 1 July 2015

Academic Editor: Yoko Satta

Copyright © 2015 Santosh Jagadeeshan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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