Table of Contents
International Journal of Evolutionary Biology
Volume 2016, Article ID 4846565, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/4846565
Research Article

New Insights into the Effects of Several Environmental Parameters on the Relative Fitness of a Numerically Dominant Class of Evolved Niche Specialist

1School of Science, Engineering and Technology, Abertay University, Bell Street, Dundee DD1 1HG, UK
2Department of Industrial Microbiology and Biotechnology, Faculty of Biology and Environmental Protection, University of Łódź, Łódź, Poland

Received 30 September 2016; Accepted 24 November 2016

Academic Editor: Santiago F. Elena

Copyright © 2016 Anna Kuśmierska and Andrew J. Spiers. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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