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Research Letters in Ecology
Volume 2007 (2007), Article ID 34212, 4 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2007/34212
Research Letter

Mineral Licks Attract Neotropical Seed-Dispersing Bats

1Leibniz Institute for Zoo- and Wildlife Research, Alfred-Kowalke Street 17, Berlin 10315, Germany
2Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, P.O. Box 0843-03092, Balboa, Ancon, Panama
3Department of Biology, Center for Ecology and Conservation Biology, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215, USA
4Department of Biology, Stable Isotope Laboratory, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215, USA

Received 4 September 2007; Accepted 10 October 2007

Academic Editor: B. A. Hawkins

Copyright © 2007 Christian C. Voigt et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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