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Research Letters in Ecology
Volume 2007, Article ID 84234, 4 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2007/84234
Research Letter

Host Specificity in the Parasitic Plant Cytinus hypocistis

School of Biological Sciences, University of Bristol, Woodland Road, Bristol BS8 1UG, UK

Received 2 September 2007; Accepted 14 December 2007

Academic Editor: John J. Wiens

Copyright © 2007 C. J. Thorogood and S. J. Hiscock. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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