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International Journal of Ecology
Volume 2010, Article ID 503759, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/503759
Research Article

Genetic Variation in Past and Current Landscapes: Conservation Implications Based on Six Endemic Florida Scrub Plants

1Archbold Biological Station, P.O. Box 2057, Lake Placid, FL 33862, USA
2Friesner Herbarium, Butler University, 4600 Sunset Ave., Indianapolis, IN 46208, USA
3Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh, 20A Inverleith Row, EH3 5LR, Edinburgh Scotland, UK
4The Nature Conservancy, Department of Botany, University of Florida, P.O. Box 118526, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA

Received 29 May 2009; Revised 9 December 2009; Accepted 18 January 2010

Academic Editor: Bradford Hawkins

Copyright © 2010 Eric S. Menges et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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