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International Journal of Ecology
Volume 2010, Article ID 635852, 17 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/635852
Research Article

The Species Richness of Vascular Plants and Amphibia in Major Plant Communities in Temperate to Tropical Australia: Relationship with Annual Biomass Production

1Botany Departments, Universities of Adelaide, Melbourne, and Queensland, 107 Central Avenue, Saint Lucia, Queensland 4067, Australia
2Department of Environmental Biology, University of Adelaide, South Australia 5005, Australia

Received 6 November 2009; Accepted 9 May 2010

Academic Editor: Mark S. Ashton

Copyright © 2010 R. L. Specht and M. J. Tyler. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

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