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International Journal of Ecology
Volume 2010, Article ID 924197, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/924197
Research Article

Trend of the Yellowstone Grizzly Bear Population

12528 W. Klamath Avenue, Kennewick, WA 99336, USA
2National Marine Fisheries Service, National Marine Mammal Laboratory, 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Bldg. 4, Seattle, WA 98115, USA

Received 4 March 2010; Accepted 8 April 2010

Academic Editor: Mats Olsson

Copyright © 2010 L. L. Eberhardt and J. M. Breiwick. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Citations to this Article [10 citations]

The following is the list of published articles that have cited the current article.

  • L. L. Eberhardt, and J. M. Breiwick, “Models for Population Growth Curves,” ISRN Ecology, vol. 2012, pp. 1–7, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
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