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International Journal of Ecology
Volume 2016, Article ID 6417913, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/6417913
Research Article

Differences in Functional Trait Distribution between Inselberg and Adjacent Matrix Floras

School of Environmental and Rural Science, University of New England, Armidale, Australia

Received 30 June 2016; Accepted 26 September 2016

Academic Editor: Béla Tóthmérész

Copyright © 2016 John T. Hunter. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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