Table of Contents
International Journal of Family Medicine
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 312492, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/312492
Research Article

Health and Functional Status of Adults with Intellectual Disability Referred to the Specialist Health Care Setting: A Five-Year Experience

1Centre for Education and Research on Ageing, Concord Hospital and Sydney University, Concord, NSW 2139, Australia
2Developmental Assessment Service, St. George Hospital, Kogarah, NSW 2217, Australia

Received 30 November 2010; Revised 16 June 2011; Accepted 9 August 2011

Academic Editor: Henny Lantman

Copyright © 2011 L. Lee et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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