Table of Contents
International Journal of Family Medicine
Volume 2012, Article ID 768461, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/768461
Research Article

The Attitudes and Practices of General Practitioners about the Use of Chaperones in Melbourne, Australia

Department of General Practice, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC 3168, Australia

Received 4 April 2012; Revised 31 May 2012; Accepted 9 July 2012

Academic Editor: Ruth Kalda

Copyright © 2012 Oliver van Hecke and Kay M. Jones. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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